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Diabetes

  • 30.3 million people—9.4% of the U.S. population—had diabetes in 2015
  • This total included 30.2 million adults aged 18 years or older, of which 7.2 million were not aware that they had the condition
  • The percent of adults with diabetes increased with age, reaching 25.2% among those aged 65 years or older
  • About 95% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes
  • Overall, prevalence was higher among American Indians/Alaska Natives, non-Hispanic blacks, and people of Hispanic ethnicity than among non-Hispanic whites and Asians 
  • Southern and Appalachian regions of the United States have the highest prevalence of diagnosed diabetes

Prediabetes

  • An estimated 33.9% of U.S. adults aged 18 years or older (84.1 million people) had prediabetes in 2015, based on their fasting glucose or A1C level. Nearly half of adults aged 65 years or older had prediabetes
  • Among adults with prediabetes, only 11.6% reported being told by a health professional that they had the condition
  • Age-adjusted data for 2011–2014 indicated that more men (36.6%) than women (29.3%) had prediabetes

Risk Factors

  • 87.5% of adults were overweight or obese, defined as a body mass index (BMI) of 25 kg/m2 or higher
  • 73.6% of adults had systolic blood pressure of 140 mm Hg or higher or diastolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg or higher, or they were on prescription medication for high blood pressure
  • 40.8% of adults were physically inactive
  • 15.9% of adults were current smokers, and 34.5% had quit but had a history of smoking                  

Coexisting Conditions and Complications

  •  7.2 million hospital discharges were reported with diabetes as a listed diagnosis among U.S. adults aged 18 years or older
  • 14.2 million emergency department visits were reported with diabetes as a listed diagnosis among adults aged 18 years or older
  • Among U.S. adults aged 20 years or older with diagnosed diabetes, the estimated crude prevalence of chronic kidney disease was 36.5%
  • Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States in 2015

Cost

  • The total estimated cost of diagnosed diabetes in the United States in 2012 was $245 billion
  • Average medical expenditures for people with diagnosed diabetes were about $13,700 per year. $7,900 was attributed to diabetes
  • After adjusting for age group and sex, average medical expenditures among people with diagnosed diabetes were 2.3 times higher than expenditures for people without diabetes

 

Source: CDC 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report